Leisure-time physical activity levels and risk of coronary heart disease and death the multiple risk factor intervention trial

Cover of: Leisure-time physical activity levels and risk of coronary heart disease and death |

Published by American Medical Association in Chicago .

Written in English

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Edition Notes

Photocopy of: JAMA: the journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 258, no. 17, (1987), pp.2388-2395.

Book details

Other titlesJAMA: the journal of the American Medical Association.
StatementArthur S. Leon ... [et al.].
ContributionsLeon, Arthur S., American Medical Association.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17136776M

Download Leisure-time physical activity levels and risk of coronary heart disease and death

Abstract T he relation of self-selected leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) to first major coronary heart disease (CHD) events and overall mortality was studied in 12 middle-aged men participating in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention by: The relation of self-selected leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) to first major coronary heart disease (CHD) events and overall mortality was studied in 12, middle-aged men participating in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention by: Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire.

The risk estimate for coronary heart disease death, after adjusting for age, was for sedentary men who expended 40 kcal/wk in LTPA compared with very active men who expended 3, kcal/wk. This relation was attenuated by adjusting for other coronary heartCited by: Greater leisure-time activity and exercise intensity were also associated with lower risk of CHD, stroke, and CVD.

With ischemic stroke, the associations were similar. Significant associations were not observed for hemorrhagic stroke, but comprised only 74 events (Tables I and II Cited by:   Individuals who engaged in the equivalent of min/wk of moderate-intensity leisure-time physical activity (minimum amount, U.S.

federal guidelines) had a 14% lower coronary heart disease. This study was designed to define the effect of different levels of leisure time physical activity on cardiorespiratory fitness and progression of coronary atherosclerotic lesions in unselected patients with coronary artery disease.

Background. It has been shown in various studies that regression of coronary atherosclerotic lesions can be. Abstract. Coronary heart disease (CHD) and its clinical complications are preventable through established primary or secondary interventions.

Strong and clear evidence indicates that higher levels of self-reported physical activity and measured cardiorespiratory fitness have been observed in epidemiologic studies to be associated with lower incidence CHD.

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for > deaths in 1 Several studies have confirmed the overall benefit of physical activity in reducing the risk of CHD.

2 Still, more than 60% of American adults are not regularly active. 3 The necessary quantity and intensity of physical activity for the primary prevention of CHD remain. Leon AS, Connett J, Jacobs DR Jr, Rauramaa R. Leisure-time physical activity levels and risk of coronary heart disease and death: the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial.

JAMA ; Regular physical activity that is performed on most days of the week reduces the risk of developing or dying from some of the leading causes of illness and death in the United States. Regular physical activity improves health in the following ways: Reduces the risk of dying prematurely.

Reduces the risk of dying prematurely from heart disease. SPAIN DM, BRADESS VA. Sudden death from coronary atherosclerosis; age, race, sex, physical activity, and alcohol.

AMA Arch Intern Med. Aug; (2)– BRESLOW L, BUELL P. Mortality from coronary heart disease and physical activity of work in California. J Chronic Dis. Apr; –   Paffenbarger RS, Hale WE. Work activity and coronary heart mortality.

N Engl J Med. Mar 13; (11)– Leon AS, Connett J, Jacobs DR, Jr, Rauramaa R. Leisure-time physical activity levels and risk of coronary heart disease and death. The Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial.

JAMA. Nov 6; (17)– WHETHER REGULAR exercise is associated with an overall reduction in the risk of coronary heart disease, including sudden cardiac death, is no longer a source of controversy. However, less understood is the exercise intensity required to achieve the cardiac benefit of regular exercise.

In early epidemiological studies, 1,2, vigorous exercise was associated with a decreased risk of sudden.

Men with low physical fitness and high occupational physical activity are recently shown to have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The association between occupational physical activity with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality may. All-cause mortality risk associated with each doubling of habitual exercise volume and by linear increase in physical activity (inset) in 15, patients with stable coronary heart disease.

Selected characteristics of patients who had the greatest reduction in mortality associated with increase in physical activity are also illustrated. Individuals who engaged in the equivalent of min/wk of moderate-intensity leisure-time physical activity (minimum amount, US federal guidelines) had a 14% lower coronary heart disease risk (relative risk, ; 95% confidence interval, to ) compared with.

Physical activity is associated to a lower risk of mortality from all-causes and from coronary heart disease. The long-term effects of changes in physical activity on coronary heart disease are.

To determine whether leisure‐time physical activity (LTPA) is independently associated with all‐cause and cardiovascular mortality and with incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke in older adults.

Increased exercise level and plasma lipoprotein concentrations: a one-year, randomized, controlled study in sedentary, middle-aged men. Metabolism. Jan; 32 (1)– Leon AS, Connett J, Jacobs DR, Jr, Rauramaa R.

Leisure-time physical activity levels and risk of coronary heart disease and death. Over the past 40 years, evidence has accumulated on the role of physical activity in preventing and treating coronary heart disease (CHD). The findings are consistent and show that sedentary people have about twice the risk of developing or dying from CHD, compared to active people.

Physical activity or fitness clearly reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), with a magnitude of risk reduction comparable to that of not smoking. 1,2 However, the precise mechanisms through which physical activity lowers CVD risk are not well understood.

Most studies 2 - 4 of men have focused on the amount of leisure time physical activity. Also, physical activity at work 5, 6 and the intensity of physical activity have been shown to be associated with a lower risk of disease and death. 2 Less evidence exists for women. A systematic review of 33 studies evaluated different levels of physical activity on the risk of coronary heart disease.

28 Adults who were physically active at half of the level suggested by the. Chomistek A, Henschel B, Eliassen A, Mukamal K and Rimm E () Frequency, Type, and Volume of Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Young Women, Circulation,(), Online publication date: Jul   A recent systematic review found that higher levels of total daily sitting time were associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, independent of physical activity.

The findings support that public health guidelines should. Over the last decades, numerous observational epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that physical activity is inversely related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality (1, 2).According to recent meta-analyses, regular physical activity of moderate to vigorous intensity may contribute up to 27% reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) (3, 4).

Objective To study the association of self-reported physical activity level with prognosis in a cohort of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), with a special focus on the dose–response relationship with different levels of physical activity.

Methods Data were drawn from a prospective cohort of subjects with stable CHD in which frequency of strenuous leisure time physical activity. Leon AS, Connett J, Jacobs DR Jr, Rauramaa R. Leisure-time physical activity levels and risk of coronary heart disease and death. The multiple risk factor intervention trial.

JAMA. ;(17)– CAS PubMed Google Scholar. The relation between changes in physical activity and 3-year risk of major fatal and non-fatal coronary-heart-disease events (n=), adjusted for age, social class, smoking, self-perception of health, and body-mass index, was similar to the relation between changes in physical activity.

Objective: To examine the optimal intensity of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) to decrease the risk of all cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in a population sample of middle aged British men.

Design: Prospective study of middle aged men with an 11 year follow up. Setting: A whole population sample of men from Caerphilly, South Wales, UK. Goal. Improve health, fitness, and quality of life through daily physical activity. Overview. Released inthe Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAG) is the first-ever publication of national guidelines for physical activity.

The Physical Activity objectives for Healthy People reflect the strong state of the science supporting the health benefits of regular physical. Leon, AS, Connett, J, Jacobs, DR Leisure-time physical activity levels and risk of coronary heart disease and death. The Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial.

JAMA ; – There is extensive evidence that regular physical activity reduces the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in white r, the intensity of activity required and the role of physical activity in preventing CHD in women (6,13,14,20,25,) and non-whites are documented less well.

Furthermore, most prospective studies previously reported have not evaluated a full array of factors. The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective cardiovascular population study of 19 men and women aged 20–93 in Physical activity in leisure time was estimated at the examinations in –78 and – who engage in regular physical activity.

Thus physical inactivity poses almost as much risk for heart disease as cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, or a high cholesterol level, but is more prevalent than any of these other risk factors.

People with other risk factors for coronary heart disease, such as obesity and hypertension. Objectives: To determine whether leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) is independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and with incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke in older adults.

Design: Population-based cohort study (median follow-up years). Setting: Community, five Finnish provinces. The real magnitude of the association between physical activity during leisure time (LTPA) and primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) has, however, not been completely defined.

Meta. ts included elderly men and women with CAD from the Cardiovascular Health Study. In the first set of analyses, the dose-response relationship between baseline leisure-time physical activity level and all-cause mortality risk over 9 yr was determined using Cox proportional hazards regression models.

Next, the subjects were stratified based on several different characteristics, and the. Participants were a mean age of 46 years, 50% were women, and the mean total level of physical activity was 23 metabolic equivalent (MET)-h/day and mean sedentary leisure time was h/day.

Physical activity and leisure time were associated with more than metabolic markers with patterns of associations generally as anticipated. shown that physical activity level has an effect on death rates among both older and younger persons. Data from a study of 9, Seventh-Day Adventist men aged 30 years or older in who were followed through indicated that both moderate and intense levels of activity reduced overall risk of death even late in life (Lindsted, Tonstad.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to be a leading cause of death worldwide. Because regular physical activity (PA) independently decreases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) while also having a positive, dose-related impact on other cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, it has increasingly become a focus of CHD prevention.

Current guidelines recommend 30 min of moderate-intensity PA 5.reduce the risk of hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, various types of cancer (including breast cancer and colon cancer), and depression; reduce the risk of falls as well as hip or vertebral fractures; and; help maintain a healthy body weight.

In children and adolescents, physical activity improves.Leisure-time and occupational physical activity in relation to cardiovascular risk factors and eating habits in French adults - Volume 9 Issue 6 - J-M Oppert, F Thomas, M-A Charles, A Benetos, A Basdevant, C Simon.

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