Anglo-Saxon deviant burial customs by Reynolds, Andrew

Cover of: Anglo-Saxon deviant burial customs | Reynolds, Andrew

Published by Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Anglo-Saxons -- Funeral customs and rites,
  • Anglo-Saxons -- Social life and customs,
  • Deviant behavior -- England -- History,
  • Funeral rites and ceremonies -- England -- History -- To 1500,
  • Great Britain -- History -- Anglo-Saxon period, 449-1066,
  • England -- Social life and customs -- To 1066,
  • England -- Moral conditions -- History,
  • England -- Social conditions -- To 1066

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Book details

StatementAndrew Reynolds.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDA152.2 .R49 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22796939M
ISBN 109780199544554
LC Control Number2008053814

Download Anglo-Saxon deviant burial customs

Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs is the first detailed consideration of the ways in which Anglo-Saxon society dealt with social outcasts. Beginning with the period following Roman rule and ending in the century following the Norman Conquest, it surveys a period of fundamental social change, which included the conversion to Christianity, the emergence of the late Saxon state, and the 4/5(1).

Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs is the first detailed consideration of the ways in which Anglo-Saxon society dealt with social outcasts. Beginning with Anglo-Saxon deviant burial customs book period following Roman rule and ending in the century following the Norman Conquest, it surveys a Pages: Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs is the first detailed consideration of the ways in which Anglo-Saxon society dealt with social outcasts.

Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs - OUP Oxford, - - Andrew Reynolds -- pages - Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs is the first detailed consideration of the ways in which Anglo-Saxon society dealt with social outcasts.

Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs, Andrew Reynolds, Oxford University Press,pages. Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs is the first detailed consideration of the ways in which Anglo-Saxon society dealt with social outcasts. Beginning with. Contents: Sources, approaches, and contexts -- Burials, bodies, and beheadings: interpretation and discovery -- Social deviants in a pagan society: the fifth to seventh centuries -- Social deviants in a Christian world: the seventh to eleventh centuries -- The geography of deviant burial in Anglo-Saxon England -- Themes and trajectories: the wider social context.

The concept of ‘deviant burial’ around which Andrew Reynolds has constructed this book can mean a variety of things. Anglo-Saxon deviant burial customs.

[Andrew Reynolds] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Andrew Reynolds.

Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number. Abstract This book is the first to investigate how Anglo-Saxon society dealt with social outcasts. The study begins in the period immediately following Roman rule and ends in the century following Author: A.

Reynolds. Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs is the first detailed consideration of the ways in which Anglo-Saxon society dealt with social outcasts. Beginning with the period following Roman rule Anglo-Saxon deviant burial customs book ending in the century following the Norman Conquest, it surveys a period of fundamental social change, which included the conversion to Christianity, the emergence of the late Saxon state, and the.

Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs is the first detailed consideration of the ways in which Anglo-Saxon society dealt with social outcasts.

Beginning with the period following Roman rule and ending in the century following the Norman Conquest, it surveys a period of fundamental social change,which included the conversion to Christianity, the.

Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs - Ebook written by Andrew Reynolds. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices.

Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs. This book is the first to investigate how Anglo‐Saxon society dealt with social outcasts.

The study begins in the period immediately following Roman rule and. About the author Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs is the first detailed consideration of the ways in which Anglo-Saxon society dealt with social outcasts. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs is an archaeological study of atypical burial practices in Anglo-Saxon England.

It was written by the English archaeologist Andrew Reynolds of the UCL Institute of Archaeology, based on the work which he had undertaken for his PhD, completed in Cited by: First major study of outcast burials in Anglo-Saxon England Interdisciplinary approach - places archaeological research in the context of historical texts Reveals the significance of deviant burials in social and political life Argues that organized judicial behaviour was a much earlier feature of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms than previously thought.

Burial in Early Anglo-Saxon England refers to the grave and burial customs followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the mid 5th and 11th centuries CE in Early Mediaeval England. The variation of practice performed by the Anglo-Saxon peoples during this period, included the use of.

This chapter comprises an innovative assessment of the development of the geography of burial in the Anglo‐Saxon landscape from the 5th to the 12th century.

A detailed study of six Early Anglo‐Saxon cemeteries shows that local communities not only applied deviant burials rites, such as prone burial, but that they also understood the concept of liminal burial, as many deviants are found. Get FREE shipping on Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs by Andrew Reynolds, from Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs is the first detailed consideration of the ways in which Anglo-Saxon society dealt with social outcasts.

Beginning with the period following Roman rule and ending in the century following the. Hoo deviant burials can be paralleled at a number of other sites and the choice of a barrow or barrow cemetery as a suitable place for executions to take place was evidently standard practice for the Anglo-Saxon authorities.

A common pattem, therefore, can be observed, with a distinctive range of burial practices on the one. The most well-known type of deviant burial is probably the classic staking of a vampiric corpse, usually associated with continental Europe. In Bulgarian archaeologists working near Sozopol found several centuries-old skeletons with iron rods through their chests.

Meanwhile, Czech skeletons found weighted with rocks on their chests in. A brief final chapter summarises the conclusions presented in the book that are generally in line with other recent works in seeing acceptance of the major principles of Christianity in Anglo-Saxon England by c, including its concepts of the afterlife and hence its burial rituals, but with survival or adaptation to many traditional beliefs.

Burial in Early Anglo-Saxon England refers to the grave and burial customs followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the mid 5th and 11th centuries CE in Early Mediaeval England.

There was "an immense range of variation" of burial practice performed by the Anglo-Saxon peoples during this period, with them making use of both cremation and inhumation. He has a long running interest in the archaeology of London, having excavated a Soho townhouse and recorded various buildings in the city, including Westminster Abbey, the London Guildhall and St Bride’s Church in Fleet Street.

He is the author of Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs (). Incorporating both inverted Christian and pagan rituals, the Rites of Desecration was a burial custom used to symbolically cast out suicides from the Christian community (both living and dead) in England during this period The corpse of a suicide death was considered “polluted” and unworthy of proper Christian funerary and burial customs.

An up-to-date and accessible account of death and burial in Anglo-Saxon England. The book offers insights into the society and customs of the Anglo-Saxons and provides clues about their way of life and their understanding of the world.

Through a detailed study of cemeteries, gravegoods and human remains, the author seeks to offer a review of this emotive subject. The funeral of Edgar, for example, is described in theAnglo-Saxon Chronicle, but his wake or a funeral feast is not.

The eleventh-century illustrated Hexateuch (BL, Cotton Claudius ) shows the death of several biblical figures, their shrouding and the sadness of their relatives, but no feast or burial rite. This chapter considers in detail the archaeological evidence for deviant burial from Early Anglo‐Saxon cemeteries of the 5th to 7th centuries ad.

The pre‐Christian centuries present challenges of interpretation in the absence of written evidence, and so this section of the book concentrates on the analysis and discussion of prone burials, decapitations, instances of amputation, and burials.

The British media’s portrayal of Romano-British and Anglo-Saxon deviant burials with emphasis on the vampire myth (unpublished Masters thesis).

United Kingdom: University of Manchester. Hadley, D. Burying the Socially and Physically Distinctive in Later Anglo-Saxon England. Burial in Later Anglo Saxon England cAD, 4(1. Intentional facial disfigurement is documented in archaeological contexts around the world.

Here, the authors present the first archaeological evidence for intentional facial mutilation from Anglo-Saxon England—comprising the removal of the nose, upper lip and possible scalping—inflicted upon a young adult female. This book constitutes a major reappraisal of the late Anglo-Saxon state on the eve of its demise.

Its principal focus is the family of Ealdorman Leofwine, which obtained power in Mercia and retained it throughout an extraordinary period of political upheaval between and In doing so it explores a paradox: that earls were extraordinarily wealthy and powerful yet distinctly insecure.

Isolated human interment forms a recognised category of burial in Anglo-Saxon England, and is a particular feature of the Christian period from the seventh century AD onwards. communities in England appear to have buried individuals marked out by ‘deviant’ mortuary rites at the edges of their community cemeteries Anglo-Saxon deviant.

Book reviews. Andrew Reynolds. Anglo-Saxon deviant burial customs. xiv+ pages, 70 illustrations, 28 tables. Oxford: Oxford University Press; hardback £   Burial customs are always interesting and often mysterious.

Consider this one. In early medieval Britain, particularly, it seems in Anglo-Saxon regions, fetuses and children were regularly buried up against church walls or extremely close to the same. Archaeologists have long recognized that strange constellations of bodies appeared in Christian cemeteries in Anglo-Saxon England; there are.

The term ‘deviant’ was first used to describe a discrete type of seventh- and eight-century burial by Helen Geake inin her wider discussion of the range of burial practices employed in the Mid Anglo-Saxon period (Geake87–8).

Anglo-Saxon burial compared to that of King Tut. SOUTHEND-ON-SEA, England – The Guardian reported on a well-preserved Anglo-Saxon royal burial. Sophie Jackson, Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA), said it could be compared to that of Tutankhamun’s tomb, with.

Anglo-saxon deviant burial customs () Anglo-Saxons in a Frankish world, () Early Anglo-Saxon communities in the landscape of Norfolk () Gildas's De excidio Britonum and the early British church () Anglo-Norman studies. Of course men were subject to the same laws.

There’s been many archaeological examples, even in anglo saxon culture, of men who had been mutilated and executed either for crimes or buried in ‘deviant’ burials due to some bad reputation, perceived or otherwise.

Review of 'Excavations at Mucking', Vol. 3, The Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries by Sue Hirst and Dido Clark. American Journal of Archaeology [10] Hills C.M.().

Dorothy Garrod and the skeletons in the Garden Newnham College publication. [11] Hills C.M.(). Review of Reynolds, Andrew () Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs (Oxford University Press). Here he turns his attention to probably the most famous aspect of early Anglo-Saxon culture, the spectular burial mounds, of which Sutton Hoo is the best known example.

Here Pollington presents a detailed gazetteer of all known barrow burials across England including the latest findings such as the chamber burial at s: 4. Anglo-Saxon monasteries. In AD the Pope in Rome decided it was time the Anglo-Saxons in Britain heard about Christianity.

He sent a monk called Augustine to persuade the king to become a Christian.- Explore Emily north's board "Anglo Saxon runes" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Runes, Anglo saxon runes, Book of shadows pins.

7813 views Tuesday, November 24, 2020